Seminars

The basics - what I can do to help myself

Saturday 10.30-11.15

How To Get Pregnant (and to have the best possible pregnancy).

Whether you've just decided to try to get pregnant, have been trying for a while, or are about to have IVF, fertility and pregnancy expert Zita West explains how to combine the latest medical thinking with practical advice on nutrition, emotional and psychological management and complementary therapies, to maximise your chances of conceiving successfully and achieving a happy and healthy pregnancy.

 

Saturday 11.30-12.15

The Basics. What you need to know to get pregnant and how to prepare for pregnancy.

With an overview of fertility and the biological clock, this session will go through the basics about getting pregnant, hormones and how the body works. Presented by Stuart Lavery, Consultant Gynaecologist and Director of IVF Hammersmith and a very popular speaker from previous years, Stuart will also cover lifestyle changes important for pregnancy such as smoking, drinking and optimizing your weight.

 

Saturday 11.45-12.30

Boost fertility and prevent miscarriage with nutrition.

Find out how nutrition can help you get pregnant and also prevent miscarriages. Come to this talk to discover the best diet, supplements and lifestyle factors to maximise your chances of getting, and staying, pregnant. How also to improve your chances for a successful IVF and how nutrition can help if you have been diagnosed with an immunological problem. Dr Marilyn Glenville PhD is the UK's leading nutritionist specialising in women's health, she is the Former President of the Food and Health Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine and also the author of the book “Getting Pregnant Faster". www.marilynglenville.com

 

Saturday 13.30-14.15

Boost fertility and prevent miscarriage with nutrition.

Find out how nutrition can help you get pregnant and also prevent miscarriages. Come to this talk to discover the best diet, supplements and lifestyle factors to maximise your chances of getting, and staying, pregnant. How also to improve your chances for a successful IVF and how nutrition can help if you have been diagnosed with an immunological problem. Dr Marilyn Glenville PhD is the UK's leading nutritionist specialising in women's health, she is the Former President of the Food and Health Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine and also the author of the book “Getting Pregnant Faster". www.marilynglenville.com

 

Sunday 12.30-13.15

Boost fertility and prevent miscarriage with nutrition.

Find out how nutrition can help you get pregnant and also prevent miscarriages. Come to this talk to discover the best diet, supplements and lifestyle factors to maximise your chances of getting, and staying, pregnant. How also to improve your chances for a successful IVF and how nutrition can help if you have been diagnosed with an immunological problem. Dr Marilyn Glenville PhD is the UK's leading nutritionist specialising in women's health, she is the Former President of the Food and Health Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine and also the author of the book “Getting Pregnant Faster". www.marilynglenville.com

Testing and what to do if i've got a problem

Saturday 14.30-15.15

Testing your fertility and the value of your ovarian reserve.

Just because a woman has plenty of eggs it doesn’t mean she is fertile, particularly if her fallopian tubes are blocked. If you’ve been trying to conceive for a while without success, or maybe haven’t started yet but want to test your ovarian reserve (the number of eggs remaining), this talk by James Nicopoullos, Consultant Gynaecologist at the Lister Fertility Clinic, explains what medical investigations there are available, what they can (and can’t) tell you about your fertility and how to go about them.

 

Sunday 10.30-11.15

A patient’s experience of the fertility rollercoaster and what to expect.

If you are about to start fertility treatment for the first time, prepare yourself for the physical and emotional ups and downs ahead with this talk by Jessica Hepburn, Fertility Road columnist, trustee at Infertility Network UK and author of Amazon bestseller, The Pursuit of Motherhood, which chronicles her long struggle to have a child. Jessica outlines her experiences and offers practical advice following 10 cycles of IVF and her tips for survival?

 

Sunday 11.30-12.15

An overview of the common causes of infertility and the main approaches to treatment.

If you've been trying to conceive for a while without success, this session could help you decide on your next steps. Looking at some of the main reasons why couples fail to conceive, Mr Hamed Al-Taher, lead consultant at Bourn Hall in Norwich, the clinic founded by IVF pioneers Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards, will cover the basic areas of testing used to identify common causes of infertility and offer an overview of the range of treatments available at specialist fertility clinics.

Treatment options

Saturday 12.30-13.15

Factors to consider when choosing a fertility clinic.

Getting the right fit is just as essential as comparing success rates when deciding on a fertility clinic. Kate Brian, journalist, broadcaster, author of bestselling The Complete Guide to IVF, mother of two IVF children and regional organiser for Infertility Network UK, has been through it all. In this talk she guides you through the issues from a clinic's location, culture, specialisations and waiting times to analysing costs and using the mass of data available on the HFEA website, data that clinics are legally obliged to provide on the outcomes of their fertility treatments, in order to compare success rates.

 

Saturday 13.45-14.30

Improving the odds of IVF working for you.

It was only in 1978 that the world’s first IVF baby was born in the UK. However more than 30 years later, less than 1 in 3 cycles of IVF are actually successful. Yacoub Khalaf, Consultant Gynaecologist and Medical Director of the Assisted Conception Unit at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS, explains what is understood to influence the success or failure of an IVF cycle including some of those factors within a patient’s control.

 

Sunday 12.30-13.15

Natural Cycle and Mild IVF – fertility treatment without the drugs?

Natural Cycle IVF and Mild IVF are two forms of IVF which require no, or very little, use of the ovary stimulating drugs normally associated with this form of treatment and which can add to the stress and risks of treatment. Professor Geeta Nargund, Medical Director of CREATE Fertility, explains how it works and whether it’s right for you.

 

Sunday 13.45-14.30

Improving the odds of IVF working for you.

It was only in 1978 that the world’s first IVF baby was born in the UK. However more than 30 years later, less than 1 in 3 cycles of IVF are actually successful. Yacoub Khalaf, Consultant Gynaecologist and Medical Director of the Assisted Conception Unit at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS, explains what is understood to influence the success or failure of an IVF cycle including some of those factors within a patient’s control.

 

Sunday 14.30-15.15

Choosing a clinic by researching success rates

All UK fertility clinics that offer IVF are regulated by the Human Fertilisation Embryology Authority (HFEA), and part of a clinic’s legal obligations is to provide the HFEA with extensive and detailed information on the outcomes of their fertility treatments. This mass of data, including age, treatment type, donor requirements, genetic screening, storage and many other factors, can be drilled down into, free, via the HFEA website allowing detailed interrogation of a clinic’s success rates for almost any scenario. Juliet Tizzard, Director of Strategy and Corporate Affairs at the HFEA, shows you how to use it.

New IVF techiniques

Saturday 11.30-12.15

Innovations in embryo selection. Do they really make a difference?

Newspapers are full of headlines about developments in genetic screening and time-lapse imaging that allow clinics to select the embryo for transfer most likely to succeed in an ivf cycle. But are these reports reliable and should patients be pinning their hopes (and cash) on such techniques? Rachel Cutting MBE, Chair 2010-2014 of the Association of Clinical Embryologists and Principal Embryologist at Jessop Fertility in Sheffield, provides guidance.

 

Saturday 11.45-12.30

Immunology – potentially hazardous treatment or your best chance of success?

Reproductive immunology is a form of fertility treatment based on the belief that repeated miscarriages can be caused by the body’s immune system rejecting a pregnancy. According to the HFEA website, treatments for immunology carry risks, potential side effects and there’s little scientific evidence to show they work. Mr Amin Gafar, Medical Director of The Newlife Fertility Clinic, one of only a handful of clinics offering this treatment, makes the case for whilst Professor Lesley Regan, Chair and Head of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at St Mary’s Hospital and professional member of the HFEA Research Licence Committee, makes the case against.

 

Saturday 14.30-15.15

New technologies in IVF

Every year newspaper headlines boast of scientific breakthroughs - in genetics, cryopreservation, laboratory technologies and elsewhere - that promise to improve the success rates of fertility treatment. So what new technologies are IVF clinics incorporating into their treatment options and what are the outcomes and evidence to justify their cost? In this talk, senior doctors from two different clinics describe some of the emerging technologies they employ and their reasons. With Professor Simon Fishel, founder of UK group CARE Fertility and one of the original team who pioneered IVF 35 years ago, and Dr Brandon Bankowski, physician and surgeon at US-based Oregon Reproductive Medicine. Chaired by Sarah Norcross, commissioning editor of online newsletter BioNews.

 

Sunday 14.30-15.15

New technologies in IVF

Every year newspaper headlines boast of scientific breakthroughs - in genetics, cryopreservation, laboratory technologies and elsewhere - that promise to improve the success rates of fertility treatment. So what new technologies are IVF clinics incorporating into their treatment options and what are the outcomes and evidence to justify their cost? In this talk, specialists from two different clinics describe some of the emerging technologies they employ and their reasons. With Lucy Richardson, Senior Clinical Embryologist at the UK's Herts and Essex Fertility Centre and Dr Ernesto Bosch, Medical Director of IVI Valencia in Spain. Chaired by Sarah Norcross, commissioning editor of online newsletter BioNews.

Treating particular problems and scenarios

Saturday 10.30-11.15

Dealing with Recurrent Miscarriage

Recurrent miscarriage (ie when miscarriage occurs 3 or more times) is highly distressing and affects 1 in every 100 women. And yet most couples who have faced it still have a good chance of a successful birth in the future. Professor Lesley Regan, Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, and Britain’s foremost expert on the subject, talks about what we know about the reasons behind recurrent miscarriages and the most effective ways of investigating and treating it.

 

Saturday 10.45-11.30

Stress and its impact on fertility.

What do we know about the impact of stress on men and women’s ability to conceive? And what can we do about it? Research undertaken by Jacky Boivin, Professor of Health Psychology at Cardiff University and Lead Researcher at Cardiff Fertility Studies, has debunked popular myths, given credibility to longstanding claims about stress effects on reproductive health and provoked important changes in the delivery of psychosocial services to people with fertility problems. In this talk she identifies some of the life style changes that can mitigate the impact of stress.

 

Saturday 12.30-13.15

Reduced ovarian reserve: Is anyone too difficult to treat?

As medical techniques improve, so the boundaries of those who can be helped to conceive through reproductive medicine seem to widen. Seemingly, age and a host of medical conditions now offer no barriers to parenthood. Yet still, many thousands struggle to conceive even after years of stressful and expensive treatment. What are the boundaries of reproductive medicine today and can anyone be treated and any problem overturned? Sam Abdalla, Director of the Lister Fertility Clinic, explains.

 

Saturday 14.45-15.30

Dealing with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

PCOS is a common cause of infertility in women and particularly common among women with ovulation problems. Adam Balen, Professor of Reproductive Medicine and Surgery at Leeds NHS Centre for Reproductive Medicine and Chairman of the British Fertility Society, talks about what is known about PCOS and the most effective ways of investigating and treating it.

 

Saturday 15.45-16.30

Fertility treatment for older women.

A woman’s ability to conceive reduces with age especially after the age of 40. In this talk Tarek El-Toukhy, Consultant in Reproductive Medicine and Surgery at Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital, outlines the issues relating to compromised ovarian reserve and discusses the options and new techniques that can boost fertility and improve success rates for women over 40.

 

Sunday 10.30-11.15

Dealing with, and treating, Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a common condition in which the cells which normally line the uterus implant around the outside of the uterus and/or ovaries, causing internal bleeding and pain. It's affects up to 2 million women in the UK and can substantially reduce fertility. Whilst there is no "cure", there are different treatments. Haitham Hamoda, Consultant Gynaecologist in reproductive medicine and surgery at King's College Hospital, talks through the issues and outlines what can be done to preserve or restore fertility.

 

Sunday 11.45-12.30

Fertility treatment for older women.

A woman's ability to conceive reduces with age especially after the age of 40. In this talk Dimitrios Nikolaou, Consultant Gynaecologist, lead clinician at Chelsea and Westminster NHS Hospital's Assisted Conception Unit and Medical Director of Fertility for Life, outlines the issues relating to compromised ovarian reserve and discusses the options and new techniques that can boost fertility and improve success rates for women over 40.

 

Sunday 15.30-16.15

Nutrition to help with PCOS, endometriosis and fibroids

Find out how you can help yourself reduce your symptoms and boost your fertility. This talk will cover the best diet, vitamins and minerals and herbs for balancing hormones for PCOS, endometriosis and fibroids.  Learn about reversing insulin resistance naturally for PCOS and how your gut and liver play a role in controlling oestrogen dependent endometriosis and fibroids.  Are phytoestrogens a good food to eat?  Hormone disrupting chemicals from the environment will also be discussed.  Dr Marilyn Glenville PhD is the UK's leading nutritionist specialising in women's health, she is the Former President of the Food and Health Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine and also the author of the book ‘Getting Pregnant Faster’ and ‘Fat around the Middle’.www.marilynglenville.com.

 

Sunday 15.45-16.30

How to deal with the diagnosis of unexplained infertility

With daily scientific discoveries, not least in the field of reproductive medicine, what more frustrating diagnosis can there be than "unexplained infertility"? Yet HFEA data shows that nearly 25% of those undergoing IVF in the UK are given this explanation by their doctors as the reason they cannot conceive. Dr Melanie Davies, consultant in the Reproductive Medicine Unit at London's NHS University College Hospital, offers some insight into the term, why finding the cause of infertility can be so difficult and what can be done following such a diagnosis.

Donor treatment

Saturday 13.30-14.15

Issues for families created with donors

If you are hoping to use donated sperm, eggs or embryos to start your family, then the issues of what, when and how to tell a child about their genetic origin becomes crucial. This can be even more complicated with the use of anonymous overseas donors. Ginny Baillie, mother to two donor conceived sons and a Trustee of Donor Conception Network, an organisation of 1,700 families created with the help of donors, discusses being open with children.

 

Saturday 16.30-17.15

Sperm and egg donors from the UK

The shortage of UK egg and sperm donors lead many who need donor treatment to look abroad, but two recent initiatives may now make it easier to find them closer to home. Laura Witjens, Chief Executive of the National Gamete Donation Trust, a charity formed to help overcome donor shortages, talks about the National Sperm Bank, a project they recently set up with Birmingham Women's NHS Hospital and Kamal Ahuja, Director of the London Women's Clinic, talks about their new service, The London Egg Bank. How is easy it to find donors in the UK now, what do we know about them, what are the waiting times, what's involved?

Treatment abroad

Saturday 10.45-11.30

Going abroad for treatment? Question time featuring 2 overseas clinics.

As more and more Brits head abroad for fertility treatment - often driven by the availability of donors, prices, waiting times or treatments not available in the UK - selecting a clinic overseas can feel like wandering into the unknown. Come to this session with your list of questions for fertility specialists from 2 different clinics – Dr Bruce Shapiro of The Fertility Center of Las Vegas and and Dr Natalia Szlarb from IVF Spain - who between them deal with hundreds of British patients every year and who hope to allay your fears. Chaired by Kate Brian, journalist, broadcaster and author of bestselling The Complete Guide to IVF.

 

Saturday 15.45-16.30

Planning treatment abroad? The arguments for travelling to the USA vs Greece vs Norway.

There are many reasons people travel abroad for fertility treatment and these include access to donors, competitive prices, waiting times, surrogacy and treatments not currently available in the UK. In this talk, doctors from three different clinics from around the world set out the reasons why you might consider travelling to their country for treatment. Dr Angeline Beltsos of The Fertility Centers of Illinois, Dr Artemis Karkanaki of Iakentro IVF in Greece and Dr Jon Hausken from Norwegian Klinikk Hausken. With an introduction from Susan Seenan, Chief Executive of patient support group Infertility Network UK.

 

Saturday 16.45-17.30

Travelling to the USA for egg donor treatment – the patient's perspective and the clinic that treated them

After several unsuccessful IVF cycles in the UK, Sarah Esdaile and her partner begun a programme of treatment at Shady Grove Fertility, a clinic based in the USA, using an egg donor. In this talk Sarah explains what happened in her earlier treatment, why that lead to the decision to look for a donor, and, having made that decision, the reasons and thought processes behind opting for a clinic in the States - for whom she has recently become an advocate - whilst Dr Michael Levy, Director of the Donor egg programme at Shady Grove, explains the processes involved and what he believes are the advantages US clinics offer UK patients.

 

Sunday 10.45-11.30

Planning treatment abroad? The arguments for travelling to Greece vs The Czech Republic vs Russia.

There are many reasons people travel abroad for fertility treatment and these include access to donors, competitive prices, waiting times, surrogacy and treatments not currently available in the UK. In this talk, doctors from three different clinics from around the world set out the reasons why you might consider travelling to their country for treatment. Dr. Dimitrios Dovas of The NewLife IVF Centre in Greece, Dr Renata Huttelova, Leading Embryologist at CUBE Fertility Clinic Prague and Dr Yulia Gurtovaya, a consultant at West Middlesex University Hospital who speaks on behalf of Russian IVF clinic CRM MAMA. With an introduction from Susan Seenan, Chief Executive of patient support group Infertility Network UK.

 

Sunday 13.45-14.30

What to think about before going abroad for treatment.

A substantial number of UK patients are travelling abroad for fertility treatment and many have positive experiences. However, there are issues to consider before deciding to go. In this talk Ben Saer, who with his wife Becky had successful fertility treatment in the Czech Republic and who now together run yourivfjourney.com, a website that helps and supports patients going abroad for treatment, offers guidance based on their experiences surrounding standards, safety, success rates, logistics, legalities, donors and support, whilst Dr Elias Tsakos, Clinical Director of EmbryoClinic IVF Greece and Dr Pedro Barri of Spanish IVF clinic Women's Health Dexeus, offer their perspectives of the issues faced by IVF patients from the UK.

 

Sunday 15.45-16.30

Overseas egg donors. Who are they and how are they chosen?

For UK patients considering donor treatment, overseas clinics, free of some of the constraints governing UK clinics, appear to offer immediate access to a ready supply of egg donors. But who are these donors and how are they chosen? Speakers from two clinics, one Spanish and one Greek - Dr Ramon Aurell, IVF Unit Medical Director of Hospital Quirón Barcelona and Dr Nikos Christoforidis, Clinical Director of Embryolab based in Thessaloniki - explain. With an introduction by Susan Seenan of patient support group, Infertility Network UK

Complementary therapies

Saturday 12.45-13.30

Complementary therapies – can they boost your fertility?

Claims for many complementary treatments have been made, by practitioners and patients alike, as miracle cures for infertility. But amongst the medical profession there is much discussion over the lack of evidence supporting these claims. Dr Gillian Lockwood, Medical Director of Midland Fertility Services and ethics spokesperson for the British Fertility Society, chairs this session with an introduction outlining some of the views of the medical profession whilst Dr Xiao-Ping Zhai who practices traditional Chinese Medicine at the Zhai Clinic in London and Barbara Scott, chair of the Association of Reproductive Reflexologists, present their experiences in helping those who have struggled to conceive.

 

Saturday 13.45-14.30

Freeing your mind to improve fertility

For hundreds of years ancient healing practices have made claims of the link between mind and body but today, research is starting to provide evidence to back this up. Russell Davis believes too many couples go through treatment unnecessarily and that success rate are unnecessarily low due to the mind being a factor. Russell is a Cognitive Hypnotherapist, founder of The Fertile Mind and the National Council of Hypnotherapy's Fertility Specialist Advisor and works with women and couples all over the world.  His personal experience of infertility echoes his clinical experience in that stress, limiting thoughts and beliefs can all affect outcomes. In this talk he offers some techniques to help improve your chances of success.

 

Saturday 16.45-17.30

Can acupunture improve fertility?

A great deal has been said about the role of acupuncture in fertility but does it actually work? Dr Ying Cheong, Associate Professor & Hon Consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Southampton and Clinical Director of The Complete Fertility Centre at Southampton’s Princess Anne Hospital, outlines what we know about the benefits of acupuncture for those struggling to conceive whilst Emma Cannon, holistic fertility specialist, acupuncturist and author of The Baby Making Bible and Total Fertility, explains how she works with patients and the results she has achieved.

 

Saturday 17.30-18.00

Fertility Massage and your fertility journey

An overview of fertility massage therapy, including the benefits and common conditions treated, an explanation of the common symptoms women experience in their menstrual cycle, why these occur and how massage can assist. This talk will include a demonstration of self help fertility massage that can be learnt and used in the privacy of your own home. By Clare Blake, founder of Fertility Massage Therapy & Training.

 

Sunday 15.30-16.15

Transform your fertility journey with EFT

EFT stands for Emotional Freedom Techniques and is based on the theory that the cause of negative emotions is a disruption in the body’s energy system. In this talk Sarah Holland, who runs fertilemindset.com and supports patients on their fertility journey with EFT, outlines how you can quickly learn and self apply techniques to reduce stress, quieten negative thoughts, overcome emotional blocks to conceiving and slow down the emotional rollercoaster of infertility.

 

Sunday 16.30-17.00

Fertility yoga class

Yoga is becoming increasingly popular amongst people undergoing fertility treatment as research shows that decreasing stress – as well as improving hormonal balance, sexual stamina and intimacy - can improve success rates. Come to this introductory class with Fiona Kacz-Boulton, founder of QiYoga and Awakening Fertility who runs bespoke fertility programs, and see if she can help. No special clothes required, mats provided.

Treatment on the NHS

Sunday 12.45-13.30

Fertility treatment on the NHS?

Provision of fertility treatment on the NHS has always been a postcode lottery. With government funding constraints making this worse, it is the people who best understand how the NHS works, its criteria and the information they need, who will fare best. Anil Gudi and Amit Shah, Consultant Gynaecologists who run the NHS fertility service at the Homerton Fertility Centre in East London, offer some helpful tips on how to fast track your fertility treatment on the NHS.

Issues for men

Saturday 15.30-16.15

What men need to know about their fertility - testing it, boosting it, treating it. (Repeated sunday 12.45, below)

It is often women who carry the shame and worry of infertility and yet men are a significant cause of problems in nearly half of all cases. A low sperm count or poor quality sperm, obstructions or mechanical difficulties can all be problems for those struggling to conceive. In this talk Allan Pacey, Professor of Andrology at the University of Sheffield and former Chairman of the British Fertility Society, outlines the potential problems, how to test for them, how male fertility might be boosted or treated.

 

Sunday 12.45-13.30

What men need to know about their fertility - testing it, boosting it, treating it.

It is often women who carry the shame and worry of infertility and yet men are a significant cause of problems in nearly half of all cases. A low sperm count or poor quality sperm, obstructions or mechanical difficulties can all be problems for those struggling to conceive. In this talk Allan Pacey, Professor of Andrology at the University of Sheffield and former Chairman of the British Fertility Society, outlines the potential problems, how to test for them, how male fertility might be boosted or treated.

Single women and lesbian couples

Saturday 15.30-16.15

Egg freezing and preserving your future fertility.

Ten years ago, the process of freezing a woman's eggs was unreliable as few survived the thawing process. Today, flash freezing techniques mean that eggs have a 95% chance of surviving, transforming outcomes and increasing the chance for women to "preserve" their fertility until they meet the right partner. What are the options? Freeze all as eggs, freeze some as embryos, freeze and share? Presented by Tracey Sainsbury, fertility counsellor at London Women's Clinic.

 

Sunday 10.45-11.30

Single women and lesbian couples - options for conceiving.

What are the routes open to women who want to conceive without having sex with a man? Dr Raúl Olivares, Medical Director of Barcelona IVF, a Spanish clinic that treats a number of single women and lesbian couples from the UK, explains the practical issues around getting pregnant with donor sperm - known vs unknown donors, IUI, IVF and increasingly, reciprocal IVF, where one partner in a female couple contributes her eggs for the other to carry.

 

Sunday 11.45-12.30

Unknown donor vs Known donor vs Co-parenting

Single women and lesbian couples looking to start a family face big issues from the outset when it comes to choosing a donor. Anonymity may seem like the simplest route but knowing more about a donor has its advantages, not least for those who want their child to have a relationship with its father. Campaigning fertility lawyer Natalie Gamble of Natalie Gamble Associates looks at the practical and legal issues behind these decisions as well as the rights and responsibilities of the parties involved, whilst Erika Tranfield of Pride Angel, a website that facilitates and encourages conversations between donors and potential parents, offers an insight into the thinking and motivation of the people who connect via her site.

 

Sunday 13.30-14.15

Single woman in your 30s or 40s? Thinking about having a baby on your own?

Then come to this talk and let Caroline Spencer, fertility coach, ex-nurse, cognitive behavioural hypnotherapist and single mum to a donor conceived child, guide you through the decision making process. Having gone solo herself, Caroline now supports and mentors others through their decisions as well as being a trustee for the Donor Conception Network. In this talk she looks at your choices, how they relate to you, what you need to consider and outlines some of her own experiences.

Surrogacy

Saturday 16.30-17.15

Completing the family - a personal story of secondary infertility and surrogacy.

Jane Newman and her husband had only just had a beautiful baby daughter when they decided to try for another. Only this time it didn't go to plan. Nearly 5 years later after several unsuccessful cycles of IVF, a rollercoaster ride of ups and downs and an eventual decision to try surrogacy, twins were born to their gestational surrogate. In this talk Jane describes the journey, the obstacles and issues they faced and offers her knowledge, hope and encouragement to anyone facing the dark days she has experienced.

 

Sunday 13.30-14.15

Surrogacy arrangements

Surrogacy is an increasingly popular way of building a family for heterosexual couples, single parents and gay dads, but knowing where to start can be a real challenge.  Helen Prosser from non-profit UK surrogacy agency Brilliant Beginnings and Natalie Gamble, campaigner and founder of leading fertility law firm Natalie Gamble Associates, explain how to make surrogacy work, both in the UK and in the most popular international destinations, and give no-nonsense advice on the costs and the practical and legal issues you will need to think about.

Help and support

Saturday 12.45-13.30

Managing relationships through infertility

The stresses and strains of coping with, and treating, infertility put a terrible pressure on relationships. It impacts on sex, daily life, expectations of support, overcoming difficulties and can take a lot of the joy and fun away. Tracey Sainsbury, member of the British Infertility Counselling Association and fertility counsellor at both London Women’s and London Bridge fertility clinics, offers some strategies on working together including a counselling model that helps you to cope better by understanding more about what’s going on unconsciously and the conflicts with your conscious thinking

 

Saturday 14.45-15.30

Coping strategies.

Anger, shock, disbelief, shame, envy, loss of control, loneliness and isolation – all emotions that those undertaking fertility treatment may have to endure. In this interactive workshop, Wendy Martin, specialist fertility counsellor with Bristol Centre for Reproductive Medicine NHS, offers some coping strategies, and ways of looking after you when things get difficult and invites feedback and questions from the floor.

 

Sunday 14.45-15.30

The Top Ten ways to cope with infertility.

Anya Sizer is the fertility support co-ordinator at London Women's Clinic and proud mum of two IVF children, a journey which took six years against very difficult odds. More recently, she has also adopted a young boy. For over eight years she has coached people professionally on dealing with the stress and worry that surrounds infertility. In this practical workshop, Anya will go through her top ten techniques for maintaining a positive and constructive approach at such a difficult time.

When treatment isn't working

Sunday 14.45-15.30

Why should I give it another go?

If you’ve been through several cycles of fertility treatment without success, you may well be thinking carefully about whether you are prepared to undergo yet another round of emotional, physical and financial hardship. In this talk Tim Child, Associate Professor and Subspecialist in Reproductive Medicine, University of Oxford and Honorary Consultant Gynaecologist, John Radcliffe Hospital, goes through some of the science and the statistics to offer encouragement and support and to give you a few reasons why you might.

Adoption

Saturday 17.30-18.00

Steps to choosing the right adoption agency.

If you've decided to try and become an adoptive parent, the next step is to choose an agency who will prepare and support you on that journey. There are around 180 adoption agencies in England including voluntary agencies and local authorities. First4Adoption, the national information service for people interested in adopting a child in England, encourage you to contact as many as you like and in this talk Pippa Bow, who works for the service, offers this helpful guide as well as explaining the matching process, a bit of background information on children in care and a few of the steps that people who've had fertility treatment might want to consider as they go down this route.

 

Sunday 11.30-12.15

Options for adoption.

Adoption is a choice that a number of couples and single people make to start or grow their family. The adoption charity PACT (Parents And Children Together) helped over 100 families to adopt last year. Jan Fishwick, CEO of PACT, will speak about the options for people considering adoption. She will introduce domestic and international adoption, applying through a local authority or a charity and explain dual approval (fostering with a view to adopt).

 

Sunday 16.30-17.00

If you adopt a child, what support can you hope to receive?

Parenting a child who has been placed for adoption can sometimes be more difficult than anticipated. There can be levels of trauma, attachment difficulties, problems at school as well as health and developmental concerns, all of which can offer serious challenges. There is support out there and the recently launched Adoption Support Fund is available to fund a range of services to help adoptive parents meet these challenges. Alan Burnell, co-founder of adoption agency Family Futures, outlines some of the issues adoptive parents regularly face and what kind of help is available.

The seminar programme offers unparalleled access to the best minds in fertility. There's nothing like it.

 

Dozens of talks from many of the world's leading fertility specialists are available to book to get your questions answered.

 

As an example of what to expect, see below programme from The Fertility Show London last year. The 2016 programme will be published here in August 2016 when tickets go on sale. To receive an email when the box office opens, subscribe to show updates on the homepage.

 

2015 programme:

The basics - what I can do to help myself

Testing and what to do if I've got a problem

Treatment options

New IVF techniques

Treating particular problems and scenarios

Donor treatment

Treatment abroad

Complementary therapies

Treatment on the NHS

Issues for men

Single women and lesbian couples

Surrogacy

Help and support

When treatment isn't working

Adoption

Treating particular problems and scenarios

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